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Picture of WWanda
posted
I'm referring to builders and/or architects. Don't get me wrong, I love my house, but sometimes things just baffle me.

What is the purpose of having a front porch if it less than four feet wide? You have no room to face each other.

What is the point in putting two windows on a wall, when one of said windows is squished in the corner when there's plenty of room to center them?

What was the thought process when placing the front door, and one side next to the door is larger than the other side?

Why on earth would anyone build a house and have absolutely NO windows on one whole side?

WHY oh why, would you place the leaching field in the sunniest, most usuable (back yard) space when you've got an entire side yard in the shade?

Is there some reason that you would place the half bath right in the kitchen so you can see the toilet ten feet away from the table?

Lastly, I couldn't figure out why my 84" curtains were always too short. Well turns out that the tops of the windows are 87" from the floor. I guess they thought the homeowner would just get all custom window treatments.

so that's my rants about my house, got any????

This message has been edited. Last edited by: WWanda,


Wanda
 
Posts: 4855 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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One more! Why would put hardwood floors everywhere except the room that has a real wood burning fire place (picture popping and snapping embers) with creamy white wall to wall carpeting.


Wanda
 
Posts: 4855 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Becky56
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Wanda, I have asked many of those questions about the designers of my manufactured home. I understand it is built in a factory on an assembly line, but geez, just a little thought would have made it so much nicer and avoided some of the very things you mention!

Who in their right mind puts wall to wall carpeting in bathrooms?!

Tee hee...I have a built in front porch just like the one you describe. I think it is there just to make it look pretty, its in no way functional! Next year, well probably build a real porch on the front and expand the outer wall so that the faux porch becomes a part of our living room.

I love my MH and its a work in progress. Even so, I strongly question what the designers were thinking!
 
Posts: 3265 | Location: Bama G.R.I.T.S. | Registered: Jun 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of junk collector
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Every single s-c-rew in our house is at least three inches long. Curtain rods? Yes, held to the wall by three inch s-c-rews. Shelves, yup, three inch. Closet bars, yup, three inch. The four foot wide solid wood front door that weighs a ton? Nope, one and a half inch.

Go figure!
 
Posts: 3250 | Registered: Aug 06, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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quote:
Who in their right mind puts wall to wall carpeting in bathrooms?!


I have no idea. That's just gross Yuck

[quote]Curtain rods? Yes, held to the wall by three inch s-c-rews.[quote]

Smile they must have been expecting extremely heavy draperies!


Wanda
 
Posts: 4855 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Linderhof
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In another house (the only new house we've had) -- both downstairs bedrooms had closets that ran along the same wall as the door. You opened the door and smack -- there was the wall of the closet -- your turned right (or left) and entered the room. Do you realize how HARD it is to get furniture through that little space? You had to angle and turn and angle and turn . . . now the other wall had no window . . . you could have built the closet along that wall -- then you could have walked (and taken furniture) into the bedroom and had 3 foot more closet space to boot because you didn't allow for the door! And it isn't like having the closet there gave you an extra wall -- it didn't -- you had three walls to put things on in each bedroom -- it wouldn't matter which three walls!!!

This house -- the guy who laid the carpet in the upstairs bedroom used NAILS to put the pad down -- NAILS -- big NAILS! not staples -- NAILS! It was horrific trying to get the nails out and I ended up with a black eye because I pulled and it wouldn't come out and so I pulled harder -- yep -- it came right out and hand and hammer hit me in the eye!!!

I was not happy with him!

Martha
 
Posts: 5855 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of cocok
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Oh, WWanda, you have me laughing! I know some of the answers, not that it makes anything better!

quote:
Originally posted by WWanda:
I'm referring to builders and/or architects. Don't get me wrong, I love my house, but sometimes things just baffle me.

What is the purpose of having a front porch if it less than four feet wide? You have no room to face each other.
This is about the budget. You get the look of a porch, but they save money by keeping it small.

What is the point in putting two windows on a wall, when one of said windows is squished in the corner when there's plenty of room to center them?
The exterior of the house was planned before the interior, and no one bothered to consider where the windows fall for the interior spaces.

What was the thought process when placing the front door, and one side next to the door is larger than the other side?
Same as above.

Why on earth would anyone build a house and have absolutely NO windows on one whole side?

Sometimes this is building code stuff. It is so that your windows don't look directly into the house next door.

WHY oh why, would you place the leaching field in the sunniest, most usuable (back yard) space when you've got an entire side yard in the shade?
Probably just laziness, unless the building code dictates the placement.


Is there some reason that you would place the half bath right in the kitchen so you can see the toilet ten feet away from the table?

Someone in the planning process just didn't care, or wasn't thinking. (Sorry, but it was probably a man. In my experience men don't get what the problem is with this. Please excuse me if you are a man, and would not plan a house like this)

Lastly, I couldn't figure out why my 84" curtains were always too short. Well turns out that the tops of the windows are 87" from the floor. I guess they thought the homeowner would just get all custom window treatments.

Sometimes window placement is a code issue, but not always.

so that's my rants about my house, got any????
 
Posts: 7178 | Registered: Apr 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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Martha you cracked me up thinking about pulling up the nails, cuz I've done that too Smile

Coco, thanks for the explanations! I figured there had to be a reason for it, except the bathroom, of course and I totally agree with you on that one!

Oh, and the windowless thing, nothing over there except the driveway (that you pull up to) and woods and I don't think the wildlife would be offended Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: WWanda,


Wanda
 
Posts: 4855 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of BlueSkies7
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The first house we bought was a new construction in a cookie cutter neighborhood. I had no idea of pitfalls to look out for, so was just happy to have a new house. Oh, the lessons learned!!! Actually met the builder a year later, and told him about a design problem. They put the heat/ac vent in the floor right next to the stove. If you were cooking at the time it came on, anything (dust, dirt, dog hair, bugs, you get the idea) that had fallen into the vent flew up onto the stove. Sometimes you don't need to cover your pots to cook things, unless, of course you have to deal with that. He said that they would fix it on future houses. Yeah, right.



 
Posts: 280 | Location: Northeast Alabama | Registered: Jul 20, 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We rented a newly built house and it had a nice den off the front entrance. We literally had to take the desk apart in three pieces to make it around all the doorways and walls to get it in the room. Needless to say, when we moved, it stayed in the house...hope the next person liked the desk and didn't want to take it out. I always said men plan houses without asking a female what would be easy to clean, easy to decorate, and still look good.


love life
 
Posts: 1504 | Location: omaha, ne U.S.A. | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have met several architects over the years who have been quite antagonistic toward myself and designers in general.These few gentlemen did not want anyone questioning their "vision". One instance was a huge shingle style home on top of a hill. There was a clear straight line from the front door all the way through the family room. I commented that opening the front door on a blustery night would be mighty inconvenient for those sitting on the sofa watching the what(?) oh yeah sorry no wall big enough for the TV, anyway, I was met with haughty derision from this so called "famous" architect, but six months later it became my problem when my clients couldn't stand the gail winds blowing through their house. Personally most of the architects I've worked with are useless pompous wind bags.Frank Llyod Wright and his leaky roofs are a great example.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Charles D,
 
Posts: 1777 | Location: Morristown | Registered: Jun 12, 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Beau's Rose
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Wanda,

There are often posts about WT with no space to mount the rods. It's quite common. How about the huge master bedrooms with no wall space for the king bed and nite stands without encroaching windows?

We built our house 30 years ago and the plans only had one or two outlets in each room. I walked through with the electrician and had him add an outlet on every wall. Smile

What were they thinking? ... They weren't!!


~Like sands through the hourglass
~So are the days of our lives
 
Posts: 9435 | Registered: Oct 09, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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The first home DH and I bought after we married was in a cookie cutter neighborhood with poorly built homes. Everyone complained about the shoddy building practices so, Wwanda, I can relate to some of your grievances.

Our front porch was long and narrow so the only type of seating you could use would be a dining table chair, straight up and not comfortable at all for porch seating. Any type of rocker or porch chair e.g., adirondack style, would take up too much space and you would literally have to climb over the chairs to get to the end of the porch!

The master bedroom's bath had this huge odd shaped window directly across from the toilet! It was an oval window which was down to the floor and very difficult to cover. Financially poor me and DH just covered it with a sheet for the short length of time we lived there. The odd thing was all the houses had the same type floor plans but ours was the only one with that type window. We surmised it was left over from a custom built home and was used in ours to save money.

The attic door in the garage was off centered so when it was pulled down the ladder would hit the wall. You climbed up the ladder beginning with the second rung.

And don't even think of finding a stud behind the sheetrock to hang curtain rods!

Those are a few issues I can remember after 32 years! On the bright side, it had a gorgeous brick fireplace with built in shelves.


ETA...of course now in this house that we built, DH and I sometimes wonder what were WE thinking Smile

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Georgia Peach,
 
Posts: 2213 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of trish212
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Mine has always been....why is the dryer vent on the front of the house next to the front door?

Kitchen oven door when opened conflicts with dw door/freezer door. I REALLY don't like how floor tile was used as countertop. All the dimples & nickel thick grouting catches crumblies & is just an annoyance & eyesore. The upper cabinets having doors on both sides make dishes falling out the other side if people are not careful.

Why does the MB bathroom door open up and block the heater vent in the bathroom? (Barn door is going to correct this problem...TY HGTV for showing this feature!)

Those who complain of having blank walls in a bedroom, we have the opposite....every wall has an opening.. windows/doors. It makes bed placement quite difficult.

Why does the county assessor's office claim we have a fireplace and one doesn't exist?
 
Posts: 5152 | Registered: Jan 23, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Georgia Peach
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quote:
Originally posted by trish212:
Mine has always been....why is the dryer vent on the front of the house next to the front door?


I forgot this one !!
 
Posts: 2213 | Location: Zone 8b | Registered: Sep 18, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of WWanda
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quote:
I always said men plan houses without asking a female what would be easy to clean, easy to decorate, and still look good.
So true!

Charles, I know what you mean. There's a lot of architecture out there that I just don't understand.

Blueskies, wow that has to be the weirdest thing I've ever heard.

BR, I think that was pretty common and up to code in older built homes. One can never have too many outlets!

Trish, that is very strange. It just occurred to me that the valve for my oil tank is right next to the porch too. I felt bad for the oil man when he had to literally climb through the bushes to get to it.

GP, seems you've had your share of "mistakes" too. Your description of the porch is exactly what I'm talking about. We just got two new chairs and they're a bit too big, but comfy, and I have to climb over DH to get to mine Smile

Thanks for sharing everyone, nice to know I'm not alone!


Wanda
 
Posts: 4855 | Registered: Feb 12, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Becky56
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Our ductwork is in the floor. It's very obvious the vents were put in before the walls. We've had to cover some and install new ones in other places. When we ripped the original Carpet out we found covered up vents under it.


When we first got the house we were just thrilled with all the space. It was twice as big as the old house. Then we lived in it......
 
Posts: 3265 | Location: Bama G.R.I.T.S. | Registered: Jun 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of joyluck
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Architecture is one of my fav subjects and I draw houseplans for fun. However when I look at many plans drawn by qualified architects I often wonder "what were they thinking". IMO architecture has gone downhill in the last few decades.

Of course there are many reasons for some of those design negatives and they are often due to keeping costs down while adding designs perceived as upscale, codes, or just sheer ignorance IMO. Windows often are placed for esthetics (balance) on the outside of the house but don't work esthetically or practically inside. That can be a design challenge but there are solutions if the architect tries. There is likely a certain distance a leaching field has to be from a house which may be why it's in the back yard.

One of my pet peeves is inappropriate bathroom placement. Should be one of the most private rooms in the house and not directly off a kitchen or near the front door.

My current house is fairly well-designed so there are only a few things I don't like. I have to admit some are my design mistakes but seemed to be the best solutions at the time. One design fault I still don't like which was not my mistake is that the furnace vents to the front patio. It's not pretty so DH built a unit to cover it (my "patio buffet") which is useful for serving on the patio. No one knows the vent is there and since we don't use the patio during heating season it's OK but I still would have liked the furnace to be located elsewhere which wasn't possible according to the heating contractor.

I have one of those narrow verandahs (only 4' wide) which leads to a larger deck area. I can only use relatively small garden chairs and there's just barely room to walk past the other person. I'd love a larger verandah but at the time I didn't realize the inconvenience.

The MB ensuite, which I redesigned, could have had the door on a different wall which would have given me another wall for bedroom furniture. I have no idea why I (or the architect) didn't see that at the time. As they say, hindsight is 20/20.

When the electrical contractor was putting in light switches and plugs it was a good thing I happened to be on site as he was not considering balance. If there is a light switch near a wall plug I want them vertically in line. Unfortunately I was not there when he put in the doorbell unit and it's not centered on the small wall! Still annoys me. I did insist that the light switches and furnace thermostat were not immediately visible on entering the front door altho are very handy. Of course I can't access the electric plug in my entry as it's behind the furniture. It could have been a few feet to the side instead of centered on the wall.

At the last minute I added another window in the LR and wish it was deeper. To me it doesn't have the correct proportions esthetically but was what the contractor recommended. I'm possibly the only person who notices that.

We once rented a house where our Queen size bed wouldn't fit up the curved stairway so DH had to remove part of the ceiling and repair, then 2 years later do the same thing to move the bed out! Of course the house was built pre-Queen size beds so possibly understandable.


Lucky

"I have always had an aversion to the concepts of in style and out of style." ~Rose Tarlow

Inspirational pics: http://inspiration4u.shutterfly.com/
 
Posts: 12721 | Location: north of 50 in Canada zone3b | Registered: Feb 08, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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