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Picture of lady of shallot
posted
This forum is always slow. Mostly people ask to have identified items they have found/bought.
But it also can be for general discussions of antiques and collectibles.

Our oldest possession is a deed from 1705. It is vellum and has a silver seal. This was not very expensive. Bought at auction for $25.

Any other antique lovers on these forums? If so, what is the oldest item you own.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: lady of shallot,
 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I hesitated to post because I am NOT an antique lover. I can appreciate some old things but have no desire to own them.

One of the oldest things I own is a Kluklux clan booklet from the 1920's I believe. It has been filed away for some time so I do not recall. What I found interesting is it was given away in Syracuse, NY. A lot of the advertising was from churches. Even the creed was interesting. I think it is a piece of history most people do not have access to except in 2nd hand accounts.
 
Posts: 7046 | Location: North MN & Northern AR | Registered: Oct 01, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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That is interesting Metwo. What particularly interests me is that I was born in Syracuse N.Y.

My parents moved there in l932 because my Dad could get work there. . . this during the depression.

Ironic isn't it that churches would support this?
I understand that my current city of Portland, Maine also had Ku Klux Klan headquarters. My Mom told me of her fright as a child in seeing a cross being burned in her town of Williamsport, Pa. Seems discrimination wasn't confined to the south!

I think liking (or not liking) old things is just part of our nature, like any other interest or sport or hobby.
 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I used to do my back to school shopping in Portland back in the Porteous-Mitchell days!
Hmmm, I love antiques and when I win the lottery I would have lots of fun.
I guess my house is an antique as it started out c1850. Other than that, I have a set of dishes that has been in the family (with genealogy documentation) since before the Civil W @r. Then there is my Great Grandfather's moustache cup and my Great Grandmother's school slate. 2 crazy quilts from DH's family.

piney
 
Posts: 3196 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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Porteous-Mitchell days!

My first day in Portland I bought myself a pair of earrings in Porteous. Wish we had a downtown like in the olden days!

Since your things are family heirloom (and how great to have such an old house) they are especially meaningful!
 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gwenda
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Lots of things of different vintages but the oldest things in our home are arrow points made of flint that DH has collected some dating back to 1200 BP (Before Present). Otherwise we have a few things that date back to late 1800s. One thing that I find interesting is a punch ladle from the early 1900s that DH's father brought back from England during WWII. It has a handle made of rhino horn and a gold English sovereign embeded in the bottom of the ladle.

For everyday I use the silverplate that was DH's grandmothers flatware. It is just pleasant to use things with history. (I also store leftovers and similar in glass refrigerator dishes that my grandmother received with one of her early refrigerators.

Another item of interest that is currently stored is a coverlet woven around the Civil War period by what were very likely slaves in Arkansas. It is beautiful and in remarkably good condition considering that it hasn't been particularly well cared for.

Now you have me wondering what happened to the brass pot that my MIL's grandfather carried off to the Civil War and cooked all his meals in. (Finally remembered, it is in the downstairs guest room holding magazines.)It has been holding magazines in my house or my MIL's home since before I married into the family in 1967.
 
Posts: 1171 | Location: DFW Metroplex | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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We have three copper "nesting" cooking pails that husband's great grandfather used in Civil War. The largest now holds kindling by one of the fireplaces. We also have his handwritten diary from his war years.
Many antiques here- we like "old". The oldest piece is a six board walnut chest from 1720.
 
Posts: 114 | Registered: Apr 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Spanish Revival
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I have a beautiful Mother of Pearl creamer... I think that's what you'd call it, it holds cream for your coffee?? Anyway it's from 1745. I'm so afraid someone will pick it up and drop it, I store it away so no one can see it... I don't know what's worse, hiding it or possibly breaking it!?
 
Posts: 976 | Location: Florida | Registered: Aug 22, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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Gwenda, it would be wonderful to have something like arrow heads! I have always wanted to do a "dig" in my own back yard! Our town did one is several places last summer.

I have found a few old "dumps" around town on walks and picked up things. One that I kept is a blacksmith forged arm rest for a buggy.

My DD and DGD were here for a couple of days and I pointed out some family heirlooms to them. Since I am doing my genealogy I have more of a sense of the people who owned these things.

SR for something as old as 1745, I would be extremely careful as that is truly irreplaceable.

Pkpk, We also love old things. Guess you could say we prefer them to new. This is a sea chest we found at our town swap shop this summer. DH refinished it and made a new top. We do not know a date, but kept the inside as we found it.

If the diary is not too long could you make a copy of it? Or photo copy it? That way it could be shared with all your relatives and maybe given (the transcript) to your local historical society.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: lady of shallot,

 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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LOS: I remember what your chest looked like before your husband did such a wonderful job of restoring it.
The civil war diary has been photocopied in its original form and put into the West Point archives(my husband is a graduate). It has also been transcribed and put into book form for each family member.
 
Posts: 114 | Registered: Apr 17, 2013Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of conrad
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Just to chime in:
As a kid I LOVED going to the natural history museums and looking at the displays of fossils, rocks and ancient artifacts.
So the things I tend to collect as an adult are not the same as most of yours, including arrowheads, ancient stone ax heads, rocks and rare gem stones. Wink

I have a large collection of both purchased and found meteorites, (including a tiny documented piece of a martian meteorite). They are as old as...well... the stars?
The oldest thing I personally found was a 11,000 year old Buffalo tooth from a NE river bed. We used to go on outings with a University Geologist, and an Archeologist. Those were great hunts!Wink
 
Posts: 9616 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Our house is full of old things, too. But living in Kansas (which didn't become a state until 1861 and wasn't really settled until the 1870s) old things are mostly 1880s on.

Perhaps my oldest "find" is a silhouette dating from 1830. Bought at a small antique mall in the town next to us for the marked down price of $12.50 -- it is worth around $500.

Perhaps my oldest family piece are some china eggs that belonged to my great great grandmother (she was born in 1856 an died in 1936 -- so they COULD date from anywhere from the mid 1870s to the mid 1930s -- I like to think of the former!)

Martha
 
Posts: 5938 | Location: On the prairie of Kansas | Registered: Dec 17, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I love old gold jewelry. I have a beautiful diamond white gold ring with rubies and it is engraved. The date on it is 1944. The diamond is about 25 points but a really nice diamond. The old fashioned design is so pretty. I always felt sad to think someone put that in a consignment shop and sold it, but glad I found it to buy. I have all my original furniture from 1960 and some of my grandmother's from 1900's. I love old furniture. They do not make it well anymore.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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My DH! Big Grin

I really don't know. Thanks to my DMs antiquing and saving the "good" stuff as well as old family document...I have no idea. I know that I have several things from the 1800s.

I do know that I have a1885 silver dollar. With DSs recent storage unit break in and the guy bragging about ALL THAT SILVER that was THROWN AWAY! I became concerned about the silver dollars. I found them in my lock box. The 1885 is the oldest. It is in a cardboard "card" with plastic protecting the coin. And - dang it - I found my younger brother's name written on the cardboard (thick poster board) so I'm going to have to give it to him... Don't know how I wound up with it. That means that one of the three brothers probably has "mine"...and I probably won't ever see it. But I have a few other SDs so I will do what I should do.

I'll have to look around the house and see if I can determine anything older...
 
Posts: 17081 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Conrad wins!!! 11,000 years old......holy cow!
 
Posts: 3161 | Location: central PA | Registered: Jan 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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LOL!
Pretty sure this bison tooth was not what LOS was considering as old stuff? Wink
I do also have a collection of different asian, european re-ligious icons, animal skulls and native american items, hung on the high walls in our hall bath/laundry room in the mountains. Sort a "Clean up your act" room in many ways?

One of the Russian Icons is from the early 1800's. When I first got it, the images were barely visible on the old wood. Careful cleaning of the surface revealed beautiful detailed painting. This was inherited from DH's Uncle who collected lots of interesting things from world travels.

Sometimes we can end up with collections that were never planned, but after learning about them, they still speak to us in interesting ways.
 
Posts: 9616 | Location: Plains & Mountains | Registered: Jun 08, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Grapefruit
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Yep....teeth and skulls were probably not what she expected....Smile

I have to say, Conrad, that yours is probably the most unique collection that I have heard of in a while...right behind the guy who has a mustard museum...! Wink
 
Posts: 3161 | Location: central PA | Registered: Jan 08, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have a few young things. An antique dresser from the late 1800's and a small needlepoint done by my grandmother, probably around early 1900's

You know, the 'early 1900's' don't really seem that long ago.
 
Posts: 4337 | Location: SF | Registered: Feb 27, 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of Gwenda
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So glad you started this subject. I have found it intriguing. There are so many interesting things that we have and treasure.

My fear is that my children and grandchildren will see some of this as just junk. An arrowhead may be 12000 years old since a Native American knapped it, but to some it is just a rock. My DILs see silver and silver plate as just something to polish. I see it as many memories of meals shared. I know I have offered my Schloss chrystal chandelier (purchased about 1971 and still very similar to some that can still be purchased) to one son who turned it down--not because he didn't like it, but because he would have to clean it. (Instead they keep up the $29 builder special. I guess it is easier to dust. It certainly isn't stylish.)

I sound bitter and I shouldn't because everyone's tastes vary. I remember when we broke up my MILs home. Her sons had to take turns picking what they wanted from the house and there was some competition over many items. Of course, we still use most of what we got from her because we selected carefully. My BIL almost immediately turned around and sold many things he selected--obviously he was picking for value and not sentiment.

I will continue to use the beautiful dining table my MIL treasured and the silver plate flatware and dishes from my husband's grandmother and enjoy beautiful things around me. And when we are gone--well someone will just buy them at the estate sale for a song and my children will loose the memories and history and continue to live in their house with the cheap builder's fixtures.

Sorry to take such a pleasant topic and turn it into a bit of a rant. I shouldn't be responding when I am tired.
 
Posts: 1171 | Location: DFW Metroplex | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Gwenda, I felt like I was the one writing those words. I have already started to give my DD jewelry so that she can enjoy it for many years. I have also specified that when I am Gone NOTHING is to be sold before asking all family members if anyone wants the item. My DM passed away and the furniture that all of us had given her over the years was left with her stepchildren. It did break my heart. The very few items I took, I cherish.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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So the things I tend to collect as an adult are not the same as most of yours


Well that is not because of a lack of desire! You'd better believe I would definitely collect anything old! Once our town planner told me that our town has 14 historic sites but that they do not tell townspeople where they are, a/c picking or digging etc. I have kept an eagle eye out since then. Being so close to the coast though, I'm sure that any Indian artifacts are pretty much found or so deeply buried that I could not find them.

Our Maine state museum does have a shell heap that was an "artifact" of Indian life.

Although not old (well yes, in some cases) I collect feathers, stones, beach finds, shells etc. The blue unit on the left holds some artifacts I have found.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: lady of shallot,

 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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My fear is that my children and grandchildren will see some of this as just junk.


My DD and DGD were just here this weekend and I pointed out the items that are family heirlooms and what I know of the history of them. their fear is more that I would give something(s) to others instead of them. In this family we are all antique lovers.

One thing under discussion is this pastel portrait. It was handed down to me from my mother, from her mother, from her mother and then? My mother never said it was a relative, but then she told me another image of a man was some "uncle" well in doing genealogy he wasn't, he was a grandfather. Same thing about a wooden box we have. She said it belonged to "someone" who had a boat. It did it; belonged to a great grandfather who had a packet boat on the Susquehanna river for many years.

It has been interesting to learn how many things were not exactly what I had been told. For instance there is one picture of a Carolyn that mother said was her great-grandmother. Well that was not the name of that great grandmother. So is it another Carolyn or my real great-great grandmother whose name was Emmeline?

But I have only one child and 2 grandchildren to leave things to. And their other grandmother has many, many things too to dispose of.

 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Lady of Shallot, you are so lucky to have beautiful STUFF. I say that because that was what my DD said to me once. Mom, you have too much STUFF. That is where my fear that every loved item will get trashed. I love every picture and please, please, post more. It is like walking around a treasured antique store.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of lady of shallot
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Oh, Fiboy, what a nice thing to say! I appreciate it very much!

I forgot to say that the desk was my grandmothers. My grandfather bought it for her and my mother said the first thing she did was to put a nail in the side of it to hang the phone book from! But maybe that is just one of those stories.

I think what I would do if I were you, is to take a pic of each thing that means something to you and write on the back of it which relative you would like to have it if your daughter does not. It's difficult. When I needed to give away my Empire sofa in the fall, my DD really wanted it, but when push came to shove, not enough to make arrangements to take it and store it. What she did want was for me to just keep it!

Not sure what you would like to see but here is a composite picture of mirrors in my house. Some are antique, some not. None of these were heirlooms though.

 
Posts: 12657 | Registered: Jun 27, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
Picture of KeepYouInStitches
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Take photos of family things - large and small. Print them and attach with a description to your will!

I have a collection of Fenton Burmese - glassware mostly vases. My DS knows what they are. I pointed out to both stepchildren that if something happened to not garage/yard sale those things for 25 cents each! I had my hand in that particular vase with the real gold paint on it...flipped the bottom up and showed them the Fenton price sticker.
 
Posts: 17081 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Love your collection of mirors, LOS. My grandmother had a small one in the kitchen so she could check herself before bringing out goodies for her "dessert" bridge group and one by the front door so she could have one last glance for lipstick errors before heading out....in the days of lipstick and pearls.

piney
 
Posts: 3196 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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KeepYouinStiches,I love Fenton glass. I had a friend years ago, who had worked for Fenton glass and she had a cranberry glass living room hurricane lamp. It was beautiful. When that was lit it made the room feel so beautiful. How lucky you are as well. LOS, I love all the shapes of every mirror. I did have one that had been my DGMS and my DH refinished it for my DDS entry way. The shape is lovely and looks great.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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1st DHs last Christmas, I gave him the Fenton cranberry hobnail Gone With the Wind lamp. The other big box under the tree was from him to me...a Fenton Burmese lamp.

The cranberry lamp is in my living room. The Burmese is in my bedroom.

Fenton still makes gorgeous glassware!
 
Posts: 17081 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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When my grandmother got "up in years", as she called it, she started a list of WHO would get WHAT. My Aunt thought it was kinda morbid, but Nana just knew who she wanted to have certain things. If still around, she would be closing in on 120 years old!

She gave me a "gold" pocket watch. Has 2 keys to set & wind. Crystal was replaced at some point (plastic) btu she said it came from HER mother, so has to date from Civil War times at least. Can't find any "gold" markings on it. One the works says Chas. Oudin, France. Has lots of TEENY markings on inside... kinda like notes left when repairs made??

Have my grandfather's WWI Navy uniform. Always thought he was a BIG man, but sure was small back then.

On old cedar chests! I have Dad/Mom's from 40's... a LANE. Nothing particularly "valuable", BUT I have a bit of info to pass along. Several years ago, child tragically suffocated when he got locked inside one. LANE will replace old locks for FREE on chests before sometime in early/mid 80's. Go to their web site for info. All you need is a simple screw driver and maybe 5 minutes time. New lock make you press button secure lid... can't accidently latch.
 
Posts: 5637 | Location: mount holly, NJ, USA | Registered: Sep 19, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thnaks for the info in the Lane site. I have my "hope chest" from the early '70s and DMIL's from the late 30s as well. There were 2 children that suffocated doing just that a week or 3 ago not too far from here. I know hardware stores have soft closing lid latches so little heads don't get clobbered.

piney
 
Posts: 3196 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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This was SO much fun. I made sure that I peeked in every A.M so that I didn't miss anything. Thank you all!


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Probably the oldest piece we have is a trunk, heavily carved which my husband's grandmother bought when they lived in Malaysia (architect); later they returned to Scotland and it was passed on to my husband's father and mother; they displayed it in their living rooms both in Scotland then in Canada and when they died it came to my husband. It sits in my large entrance but I have a crystal bowl (in-laws'anniversary gift) on top and some carved ducks....reason.....it is precious and visitors might sit on it or place objects on it otherwise.
 
Posts: 742 | Location: Canada | Registered: Jan 15, 2006Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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suedorcoo, That was a great way to discourage anything happening to or harm to that important, loved piece of your husband's family history. I hate to tell someone to not do something in our home. Good Idea!


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I also have many family heirlooms. I often wonder what is going to happen to them when I am no longer around. I have no children and my best hope is that my 4 nephews marry women who care about this stuff.

My oldest items are 2 portraits - one is of my Great Grandfather and the other is of my Great great great aunt. My sister has portraits of the aunt's parents. My portraits are dated approx 1870s.


~~~becca~~~~




 
Posts: 5585 | Location: dayton ohio | Registered: Jul 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Love that sitting area!


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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thanks!!! I'm really enjoying the freshness the colors bring into my home!


~~~becca~~~~


 
Posts: 5585 | Location: dayton ohio | Registered: Jul 11, 2007Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I love, love your curtains. That is my other thing....CURTAINS. Colonial curtains out of Vermont have the best catalogs. I read that catalog all day when it is delivered.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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do they have a website, flboy? I like Country Curtains but didn't see Colonial Curtains......not that I *need* different curtains right now.

piney
 
Posts: 3196 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Pinecone, LMAO, you have caught me having a brain f--t. That is the place, Country Curtains. Colonial on the brain I guess. We have purchased the shades that rollup by chain pull and are lightly weaved, so that the airy feeling is always there. Still laughing. As my kids would say....DUH!


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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lol on the brain freeze. I'll be sitting beside you in the home. Wink
 
Posts: 3196 | Location: New England, U.S.A. | Registered: May 21, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I still have some good days. I have loved this page and the beautiful pictures. Thanks all who have sent in photo's and KNOW how to send them.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The oldest things we have are a few family pictures from the late 1800's, and a spinning wheel from mid-1800's brought over from Oslo, Norway by my great, great grandparents when they came to America.
 
Posts: 4486 | Location: In the beautiful Tennessee Valley, between the Cumberland Plateau and the Great Smoky Mountains. | Registered: Jul 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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indexlady,Hang on to them! Never sell any family heirlooms. I love them all and someday people will be searching and wishing to have them all back again.

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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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These are the works of what is known as a Sunday artist, someone who is self-taught and paints as a hobby. Most have no real value beyond the sentimental.www.exportingart.com is the best platform that provides a space to show works of visual art, art galleries etc.Have a look and let me know what do you think... Smile


da
 
Posts: 3 | Registered: Mar 06, 2014Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thanks for an interesting thread.

Breaking up my parents home, found an oval dish from my grandmother. I had never seen anything like it.

We were at the Corning Glass Museum and I overheard this man talking with his group. He seemed very knowledgeable about antique class. Begged his pardon and asked him about the dish. He said it was a bread platter and from a whole set of dishes in a pattern dating around the late 1790s. Hope I am remembering the date right. Would still be old if it was the 1890s. He said it used to around in shops, but wasn't as much now.

I can sure relate to kids just getting rid of stuff.

My sis and I had to let go of a lot of things that would have been nice to have been able to keep. What was kept by me, is very meaningful.


Strings

Friends divide our sorrows and multiply our joys.
 
Posts: 6281 | Registered: Sep 20, 2002Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have my MIL'S relish dish that she always had her stuffed olives and celery in every Thanksgiving and Christmas. I smile and think of her beautiful face every time I use it.


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Posts: 2486 | Location: Sarasota | Registered: Jan 31, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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the oldest thing I have is an old victrola that I inherited from a great aunt years ago. but, someone stole the crank handle before I got it. so, it's not usable for anything but a clutter catcher on the lid. I got rid of the 78 records because I can't ever play them on it.


cheryl hill
 
Posts: 375 | Location: lansing, MI u.s.a. | Registered: Aug 08, 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I've enjoyed reading about all these beautiful things! The oldest things I have is an iron skillet. When my Mom and Dad were married in '56, each of their mother's gave them an iron skillet. The skillets had been passed down to them... My mom used them all the time and before she passed away, she gave one to me and one to my only other sibling, a sister. Someday, I will pass it along to my oldest child, my son. I have 2 daughters, but my DS will really use it, as he is a fantastic cook. He once took an iron skillet on a trip to London, England to use to make corn bread for a friend... lol I guess he would take good care of it!
 
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Posts: 17081 | Location: Daingerfield, TX | Registered: Feb 07, 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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It would have to be DH's father's bedroom set from the 1930's for furniture.
I do have a framed photo of my grandmother as a teenager in Sicily from 1903.


Life is a great big canvas...throw all the paint on it you can.
Danny Kaye
 
Posts: 7427 | Location: Central Florida | Registered: Feb 12, 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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